Smarter Facilitation

By |2020-01-12T17:48:36+00:00January 11th, 2020|Categories: Training and Development|Tags: , , |

I always welcome the opportunity to co-facilitate. Almost without exception I work with some wonderfully talented people with much smarter facilitation skills than me. It never ceases to amaze me how almost (that word again) on these occasions the delivery is seamless, it appears that this double act has been together for years. We appear to [...]

The Incomplete Metamorphosis of an Internal Consultant

By |2020-01-06T20:06:50+00:00January 6th, 2020|Categories: Internal Consulting|Tags: , |

The internal consultant and the chameleon entered the coffee shop, ordered drinks, and joined their colleagues before work. Happy and relaxed the chameleons reflecting their mood and physical comfort through their vibrant colour, the consultants confident and excited at the prospect of using their expertise, skills, knowledge and understanding of the business to facilitate change. These [...]

The conversation cul de sac

By |2019-11-21T20:07:03+00:00November 21st, 2019|Categories: Coaching, Facilitating Change, Managing Conflict|Tags: , |

When did you last find yourself in a conversation that took an unexpected turn? A comment that embarrassed or offended you? A comment that stunned you into silence or panic, you have navigated into a conversation cul-de-sac. Yesterday I was working with a group of professionals whose customers are challenging for a variety of reasons. On [...]

Shrinking Human Attention Span

By |2019-11-01T17:49:20+00:00November 1st, 2019|Categories: Learning Design, Tips for Training, Training and Development|Tags: , |

You probably won't get to the end of this article if the research about our shrinking human attention span being 8 seconds, has any substance, in fact I've already lost you...but my goldfish is still tuned in because it apparently has an attention span of 9 seconds. What a load of cod! This claim about attention [...]

The Peter Principle From Competence to Incompetence

By |2019-02-11T11:50:14+00:00February 10th, 2019|Categories: Competency|Tags: |

Laurence J. Peter analysed hundreds of cases of occupational incompetence which led him to formulate The Peter Principle. The Peter Principle book is extremely humorous, a satirical model, it was first published in 1969. What is surprising is that many of us continue to experience the impact of occupational incompetence resulting from ridiculous promotion decisions. For [...]

Developing Wizardry with the Stories We Weave

By |2019-02-13T17:48:30+00:00January 28th, 2019|Categories: Learning Design, Training and Development|Tags: , , |

As a learning designer I believe in the power of stories to sustain attention. Our brains are attracted to stories in which the characters struggle and eventually surface unknown abilities to triumph over adversity. This is why our Learning by Design course is so successful. It places the learner at the heart of the story, this helps learners [...]

Facilitating Change Moving from Bitter to Better

By |2019-01-24T19:40:50+00:00January 24th, 2019|Categories: Change leadership, Facilitating Change|Tags: |

Facilitation can be a delicate process, particularly for me today because I am holding 6 raw eggs and my audience are feeling bitter, my aim is to create an environment where we can consider the impact of entrenched patterns of behaviour and consider the mindsets required to move from bitter to better. Facilitating Change I have [...]

Little Value from Bigwigs and Stinking Thinking

By |2019-01-24T19:50:39+00:00January 24th, 2019|Categories: Evaluating Training, Return on training investment, Training and Development|Tags: , , |

A big job had presented itself at training towers. The bigwigs had attended a continuous improvement seminar where they had been publicly embarrassed by the ring masters for their stinking thinking. The big wigs arrived at training towers and the gnomes were summoned. During a verbal thrashing the gnomes were told to put out to tender [...]